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2008–2009 Annual Report on Results

2008-2009 Annual Report on Results
Implementation of Section 41 of the
Official Languages Act

June 2009

   Download as PDF (1,118 KB)

Table of Contents


General Information

Federal institution: Canada School of Public Service
Address: 373 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6Z2
Web site:
https://csps-efpc.gc.ca/index-eng.aspx

Mandate

The Canada School of Public Service is the common learning service provider for the Public Service of Canada. It brings a unified approach to serving the common learning and development needs of public servants and helps ensure that all public service employees across Canada have the knowledge and skills they need to deliver results for Canadians.

Minister and Senior Officials responsible for implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act

  • Minister
    The Honourable Vic Toews
    President of the Treasury Board
  • President and CEO
    Ruth Dantzer
  • Official Languages Champion
    Donna Achimov
    Vice-President, Individual Learning
  • National Coordinator
    Anne Hardy
    Manager, Strategic Planning and Reporting
    613-996-8421
    anne.hardy@csps-efpc.gc.ca
  • Assistant National Coordinator
    Cédric Ménard
    Analyst, Strategic Planning and Reporting
    613-947-3180
    cedric.menard@csps-efpc.gc.ca

Regional official languages representatives

Summary of Progress Made

As the common learning service provider for the public service, the Canada School of Public Service contributes indirectly to the vitality and development of official languageminority communities (OLMCs). Under its mandate, the Canada School provides learning products to public servants, and through these it actively promotes the use of both official languages in Canadian society and raises awareness among public servants of the development of OLMCs across the country.

Awareness

During 2008-2009, the Canada School pursued its commitment to raise awareness among public servants, including its own employees, regarding the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

In order to give public servants a better knowledge of their responsibilities and of the issues involved in the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act, the Canada School continued its efforts to align its P714 course, entitled Introduction to Official Languages, with Parts IV and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Moreover, the Direxion program allowed future public service leaders to better familiarize themselves with linguistic duality, OLMCs, and the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act. The participants of the Direxion program visited Francophone communities outside Quebec and Aboriginal communities to discuss issues related to minority languages.

Consultations

The Canada School has maintained its consultation efforts with OLMCs. To this end, the Canada School organized its fourth annual French Language Maintenance Forum, held in the Francophone communities of Saskatoon and St. Boniface. This event brought together nearly 90 federal and provincial public servants for a presentation on the activities of OLMCs and to establish networks with these Francophone communities. In Alberta, as part of Semaine de la francophonie, the Canada School organized an international dinner, at which public servants and OLMCs were invited to showcase dishes from their various culinary traditions. These forums, seminars and conferences gave the Canada School an opportunity to forge enduring links with OLMCs.

Communications

Through presentations, conferences and promotional activities, the Canada School has raised the profile of its products and services in all regions of the country. For the second consecutive year, the Canada School was responsible for the Pacific Region Interdepartmental Forum on Official Languages. This forum provided an opportunity to generate discussion with the Francophone communities about the federal government's policies.

Coordination and liaison

In all regions, the Canada School continued its participation in various interdepartmental networking activities such as those of official languages co-ordinators and federal councils' committees and sub-committees. This interdepartmental networking enables departments to share best practices and discuss implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act. The departments are encouraged to review their projects to find potential strategies for improved co-operation.

Moreover, some 20 public servants for whom French is either their first or second languagetook part in a course entitled Comment apprivoiser le stress(mastering stress) organized jointly by the Canada School and the Interdepartmental Official Languages Network so that participants can maintain their languageskills and better serve minority communities.

Funding and program delivery

As a way of enhancing its collaboration with OLMCs and integrating their needs into its products and services, the Canada School continued its co-operation agreements with the private sector in minority communities. To this end, it continued with the implementation of its languagetraining programs, allowing hundreds of public servants to benefit from languagetraining.

Accountability

With regards to accountability, the Canada School reviewed its online languagetraining services. The Canada School's program evaluation team weighed the relevance, success, impact, design, delivery and viability of its second-languagecourses and products and of its Campusdirect tools. The conclusions and recommendations from the evaluation report paved the way for an action plan to improve products and services.

Conclusion

The Canada School will pursue its commitment to the six results targeted by section 41 of the Official Languages Act. The Canada School is determined to forge ahead with its efforts to implement the activities envisaged in its 2009-2011 action plan.

Detailed Report on Results

Awareness

Training, information, orientation, awareness, communication and other activities carried out in-house in order to educate employees and/or senior managers of the federal institution about linguistic duality and the priorities of OLMCs; senior manager performance contracts and recognition programs; consideration of the viewpoints of OLMCs in research, studies and investigations carried out in-house.

Expected Result

Creation of lasting changes in federal institution organizational culture; employees and management are aware of and understand their responsibilities regarding section 41 of the Official Languages Act and OLMCs.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made
A more structured environment with strong leadership has resulted in more regular participation at committees and conferences. The Official Languages Champion and coordinators held more internal meetings related to the promotion of section 41 of the Official Languages Act and provided increased support in all activities to ensure the continued implementation of the Canada School's action plan. The Canada School organized several internal events related to section 41 of the Official Languages Act and official languages:

  • The Official Languages Champion and Co-Champion for the Canada School were appointed in the Fall of 2007;
  • The Canada School established an Official Languages Champion Working Group (Summer 2008);
  • The Canada School Official Languages Champion Working Group held five meetings in 2008-2009;
  • The Canada School's Champion and Co-Champion regularly participated in the ADM Committee on Official Languages and Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions.
Activities undertaken ensured that Canada School employees and managers became increasingly aware of and understood their responsibilities regarding official languages and section 41 of the Official Languages Act.
During the 2008-2009 fiscal year, the participants in the Direxion program visited several Francophone communities outside Quebec. For example, to discuss the issue of leadership in the interrelated world, they visited St. Boniface and the Acadian Peninsula. The issue of French languagebeing a minority languagein a community was a topic during interviews with various community representatives.

In addition, the Direxion program includes an Aboriginal module that allowed attendees to develop a better understanding of the Aboriginal culture and languages. During Phase II of the Program, the attendees visited communities such as Happy Valley Goose Bay in Labrador, Corner Brook, Yellowknife, Whitehorse and Iqaluit.community representatives.

The participants in the Direxion program visited Francophone communities outside Quebec:

  • Bathurst in February, 2009 (24 participants)
  • St. Boniface in February, 2009 (19 participants)

They also visited Aboriginal communities:

  • Labrador Friendship Centre in Labrador on April 14, 2008 (21 participants)
  • First Nations Community (Eskasoni) in Sydney on April 28, 2008 (17 participants)
  • Fort McKay First Nation on May 12, 2008 (22 participants)
  • Old Hudson's Bay site through Iqaluit, Tundra Valley and Nunavut Legislative Assembly on June 2, 2008 (22 participants)
  • Conseil de la NationAnishnabe in Val-D'Or on June 9, 2008 (19 participants)
  • Carcross/Tagish First Nation in Whitehorse on June 16, 2008 and in Behchoko (21 participants)
  • Conseil de la Nation Anishnabe in Val-d'Or on September 15, 2008 (24 participants)
  • Ojibway and Cree Cultural Centre and the Timmins Native Friendship Centre on September 29, 2008 (23 participants)
The Direxion program increased awareness among the future leaders of the public service related to OMLCs, section 41 of the Official Languages Act and linguistic duality.
The Canada School delivered a leadership development course, "Diversity: Vision and Action," in the both official languages. This course introduces the concept of diversity and leadership in a diverse workplace from personal, interpersonal and organizational contexts that embrace change.

In addition, one customized leadership course was delivered as a second languagemaintenance course.

The course is intended to equip managers to create an inclusive organizational culture that embraces change. The context is built upon the pillars of the Employment Equity Act, the Multiculturalism Act and the Official Languages Act. Also, all offerings are offered in English and French by bilingual staff.

The Canada School increased the numbers of planned offerings in both official languages:

  • 16 offerings — 3 in the regions and 13 in the National Capital Region, delivered to 269 participants;
  • 3 deliveries in French and 13 in English;
  • Average overall evaluation of 4.4 out of 5.0.

The course on Values and Ethics in Public Sector Governance (D-102) was added to the Canada School calendar for offerings in Vancouver and Ottawa but was not delivered due to low registration.

Managers were better equipped to create an inclusive organizational culture that embraces change.

Second languageleadership courses are now available.

Participants were better enabled to maintain their second language.

The Canada School built communities of practice which include the learners' community (user's ability test), the teachers' community and a Virtual Support Centre. The Canada School increased access to resources for teachers and learners and increased communication between them.

The Canada School continued to explore innovative practices in teaching official languageskills using technology, resulting in a collection of additional electronic pedagogical material for teachers and Canada School languagelearning students.

The communication between teachers and learners increased.

A collection of additional electronic pedagogical material for teachers and Canada School languagelearning students is now available.

During the 2008-2009 fiscal year, the Canada School continued offering Course P714 "Introduction to Official Languages" to public servants in Moncton and Charlottetown. The Canada School pursued its drive to align its products and raise public servants' awareness of Parts IV and VII of the Official Languages Act. For example, under the memorandum of understanding between the Canada School and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA), Course P714 was adapted to the department's need for a customized workshop geared to Parts IV and VII of the Official Languages Act in the context of operations in Prince Edward Island.

In addition, the Québec Region offered the P-714 "Introduction to Official Languages" course to its English teachers, which raised awareness about Part VII obligations as well as the entire OL program.

This activity allowed 31 public servants in the Atlantic Region and 48 Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency employees in Prince Edward Island to take the "Introduction to Official Languages" course.

The Canada School offered public servants the P-714 course once in English and three times in French.

Through this activity, public servants have a better understanding of the Official Languages Act, its implementation and their responsibilities for making it work.
In all regions, the Canada School offered languagetraining and maintenance activities, both full- and part-time, to public servants, including federal and territorial judges, particularly in the Yukon, Alberta and British Columbia.

These courses were offered by the Canada School (classroom instruction) and by outside suppliers. Several courses in using innovative online technologies were offered by Campusdirect.

The Canada School offered classroom languagetraining to over 2,500 employees in the regions.

In 2008-2009, the Canada School offered languageclasses to more than 70 provincial judges in the Atlantic, Ontario, Prairie, Alberta, British Columbia and Yukon regions.

Through its languagetraining, the Canada School helps improve the languagecapacity of the public service in all regions of the country. The Canada School's products and services make it possible offer to official languages minority communities better access to federal government services in both official languages.

In addition, the provision of languagetraining to federal and provincial judges enables them to serve Canadians in both official languages.

Campusdirect's online catalogue was enhanced and refreshed with quality custom-designed online training products which address the common learning needs of federal public servants in both official languages in all regions of Canada. The Canada School's Action Plan for 2009-2011 identifies the goal of ensuring that all customdesigned products will be available in both official languages.

The Canada School developed, through Campusdirect, more online self-instruction and self-evaluation products and tools aimed at maintaining acquired languageskills. Up to 70 online French-as-a-second-languageand English-as-asecond- languageproducts are available to all federal public servants.

The Canada School exceeded the languageratio target of 30% for these products.

The Canada School developed new products and modified existing products. Through this process, the Canada School developed the Language Maintenance and Acquisition Cycle and this self-directed online learning product was launched on Campusdirect in January 2009.

The Cycle guides participants through self-evaluations, suggests appropriate languageactivities and provides guidance in the preparation of a personal languagelearning plan. Preparatory exercises and simulations (writing and reading) have been updated to reflect the recent changes made to the official Canada Public Service exams and are available on Campusdirect.

This tool is used for maintaining proficiency in a second official language, which is an essential skill for many federal government employees.

The ratio was established by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

A complete suite of e-learning products is now available on Campusdirect to allow public service employees to assess their languageproficiency, maintain their linguistic levels, evaluate their progress and help them acquire second languagetraining from beginner to advanced levels.

The Canada School continues, through Campusdirect, to host new learning products such as podcasts and recorded virtual classroom sessions, ensuring that the needs of a bilingual audience are fully met through the use of bilingual audio and transcripts. All new learning technology products are made available in both official languages.

For example the Manion Lectures are available both on the Canada School's Web site and on Campusdirect. In addition, there are a host of languagetraining products that offer excellent bilingual and audio transcripts to public servants seeking to improve their second official languageskills. All custom courseware on Campusdirect is offered in both official languages and in accessible formats.

All products are as compliant as possible (i.e. provision of translation, transcripts, sub-titles, etc.).
The Canada School promoted the need for bilingual offerings to federal government departments through participation at various conferences, presentations and kiosks throughout the country. The self-paced and assessment tools have been promoted through presentations in departments and agencies and in different forums and learning events. Broadened access to languagetraining self-paced products (more than 58,000 public servants accessed the online languagelearning tools and products in 2008-2009).
During the 2008-2009 fiscal year, the Canada School developed several presentations, which were presented at the Fall Interdepartmental Forum on Official Languages of the Pacific Federal Council, the Conference on Visible Minorities and Official Languages, the Official Language Champion Meeting and the Head of Learning Forum. The Canada School developed more interdepartmental collaboration and partnership opportunities. Also, the Canada School is increasingly invited to attend events organized by other departments such as Linguistic Duality Week hosted by Public Works and Government Services Canada, Manager Forum hosted by Library and Archives Canada and welcome sessions for new employees in other departments. The Canada School had more visibility in terms of languagetraining.
The Canada School offered informal French discussions in the Pacific and Yukon Region (Vancouver, Victoria, Kelowna, Prince George, Whitehorse).

These discussions were organized jointly with the Government of British Columbia, specifically the Office of Francophone Affairs, the Pacific Federal Council, the Vancouver Olympic Committee and the British Columbia Francophone Federation.

Participation by 80 public servants in informal discussions with:

Véronique Mercier, Office of Francophone Affairs, Government of British Columbia
Discussions in February 2009 in Victoria. The theme was: "The Office of Francophone Affairs of British Columbia: Developing a strategic plan for optimum results."

Francine Bolduc, Director, Official Languages, Vancouver Olympic Committee (VANOC)
Discussions in February 2009 in Vancouver. The theme was: "Bilingual Winter Games in 2010: Meticulous preparation for exemplary delivery of bilingual services. Outstanding spin-off for the Francophone presence nationwide."

Public servants gained a better understanding of the challenges facing the Francophone community and took part in French maintenance activities to improve their skills in their second official language.
The Ontario Region held an Armchair Discussion on February 3, 2009 to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. Mr. Graham Fraser was the keynote speaker. The importance of learning French in order to have a career in the public service was raised and emphasized in the discussion. As a result of this Armchair Discussion, the Ontario Region received more queries and requests for information on what the Canada School has to offer in terms of French languagetraining.
A half-day information session for managers was developed in collaboration with the Official Languages Interdepartmental Network (OLIN) and the Federal Managers Network, and delivered free-of-charge as part of the Quebec Region's Thematic Workshops. The presentation was shared and distributed with official languages coordinators through the Official Languages Interdepartmental Network for use in their own departments. The information session raised general awareness about all parts of the Official Languages Act and included a section on the realities of the Quebec Region OLMCs.

Consultations

Activities (e.g. committees, discussions and meetings) through which the federal institution consults the OLMCs and interacts with them to identify their needs and priorities or to understand potential impacts on their development; activities (e.g. round tables and working groups) to explore possibilities for cooperation within the existing mandate of the federal institution or as part of developing a new program or new policy; participation in consultations with OLMCs coordinated by other government bodies; consultation of OLMCs by regional offices to determine their concerns and needs.

Expected Result

Creation of lasting relationships between the federal institution and OLMCs; federal institution and OLMCs understand each other's needs and mandates.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made
The first regional seminar for executives was held in Moncton in March 2009. Some 20 federal managers took part in a seminar led by Professor Gino LeBlanc of the University of Moncton, who presented his study entitled The geographic organization of human and material resources of federal government institutions in Canada: A "positive measure" under section 41 of the Official Languages Act. Lise Ouellette, Director of the Association of Francophone Municipalities of New Brunswick, the body sponsoring the study, and Gilbert Taylor, regional representative of the Commissioner of Official Languages, also attended. The study conducted for the Association of Francophone Municipalities of New Brunswick was shared with all executives in the four federal councils in the Atlantic Region. Participants gained a better understanding of the significant contribution of government operations to the vitality of the minority languagecommunity in New Brunswick and of the potential impact of human resources-related decisions on OLMCs.
In February and March 2009, nearly 90 federal and provincial employees took part in a French Language Maintenance Forum held in the Francophone communities of Saskatoon and St. Boniface. During the day, participants attended workshops held in French on themes geared to professional development and networking with the Francophone community. The community participated in a training session on using Termium.

There was also a series of mini-meetings in which various organizations explained what they do as a way of persuading public servants to join them or become more actively involved in the French-languagecommunity. At the Manitoba Forum, the Federal Council, the Community and the province of Manitoba awarded the Ronald Duhamel Prize to a public servant who had made an exceptional contribution to the vitality of the Francophone community.

Some 20 OLMC organizations explained their community activities to public servants to encourage them to become more actively involved.

This was the fourth year that the Prairies Region has offered these forums, and the number of public servants enrolled was up 15% from 2007-2008. The number of OLMC organizations participating in the networking activities held steady.

Public servants took advantage of the Forum to pursue their French training and network with French-speaking colleagues and the Francophone community, allowing them to find strategies for maintaining and improving their languageskills.
In Alberta, as part of the Semaine de la francophonie, the Canada School organized an international dinner at which Francophone volunteers (from both the public service and OLMCs) representing various countries of the world, shared their ethnic dishes. Also as part of the Semaine de la francophonie, the Canada School invited speakers (from both the public service and OLMCs) to make presentations on their native lands (Francophone countries). The international Francophone dinner was a huge success. 50 people (the maximum capacity of the hall where the event was held), including OLMC members, took part. The OLMCs and public servants who took part in the event gained a deeper knowledge, understanding and respect for Francophone diversity in Alberta.
Through participation at various conferences throughout the country, Canada School e-Learning program staff continued to promote the need for bilingual offerings to the industry. The Canada School participated at every opportunity. Reaching out to industries raised awareness of the Official Languages Act and its implementation.

Communications

External communications activities to inform OLMCs about the activities, programs and policies of the federal institution and to promote the bilingual character of Canada; inclusion of OLMCs in all information and distribution lists; use of the federal institution's Web site to communicate with OLMCs.

Expected Result

OLMC culture reflects a broad understanding of the federal institution's mandate; OLMCs receive up-to-date and relevant information about the federal institution's programs and services.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made
In the regions, the Canada School delivered languagetraining to federal employees using outside suppliers for several courses. These suppliers had been trained by the Canada School.

In the Alberta Region, the Canada School maintained its contacts with the Fédération Franco-Ténoise, the College of the Northwest Territories and Aurora College in Yellowknife and Inuvik in order to develop French-languagelearning activities in the North.

The Canada School embodies languagelearning expertise, which was used to train outside suppliers delivering languagetraining on behalf of the Canada School.

This expertise was shared with the Fédération Franco-Ténoise, the College of the Northwest Territories and Aurora College in Yellowknife and Inuvik.

OLMCs gained greater languagetraining expertise.
In the Pacific Region, the Canada School was responsible for the Regional Interdepartmental Forum on Official Languages, sponsored by the Pacific Federal Council. Consultations were held, for the second consecutive year, with representatives of Francophone associations, the province of British Columbia and federal government departments, including Canadian Heritage and the Commissioner of Official Languages. This forum gave all involved an opportunity to inform the Francophone community and the province about federal government activities, programs and policies and gain recognition of the bilingual character of Canada.
The Canada School in the Quebec Region continued exploring the possibility of establishing links outside the Montreal area in places where OLMCs are more fragile and scattered. For example, efforts were made with the Shawinigan High School to implement potential student volunteer opportunities with the Canada Revenue Agency's Shawinigan-Sud Tax Centre, where the Canada School's Quebec Region assigned an instructor. The Canada School has kept up its promotion of this approach with those clients looking for alternatives to conventional training. Awareness was raised with the Shawinigan High School as to the existence of potential for collaboration with the Canada Revenue Agency in Shawinigan Sud. Awareness was raised with the Shawinigan High School as to the existence of a potential for collaboration with the Canada Revenue Agency in Shawinigan Sud.
The Canada School promoted the need for bilingual offerings to federal government departments through participation at various conferences, presentations and kiosks throughout the country. All classroom courses for functional communities were offered in both official languages.

The Canada School participated in events such as Linguistic Duality Week hosted by Public Works and Government Services Canada, Manager Forum hosted by Library and Archives Canada and welcome sessions of new employees in other departments.

The Canada School increased visibility for its languagetraining products and developed more interdepartmental partnerships.

The Canada School is increasingly invited to attend events organized by other departments.

For the launch and promotion of the Language Maintenance and Acquisition Cycle, the Canada School developed promotional tools, one-pagers describing new initiatives, products and services, banners, posters, tutorials, and videos in both official languages. The self-paced and assessment tools were promoted through many presentations in departments and agencies and in different forums and learning events.

More than 58,000 public servants accessed the online languagelearning tools and products in 2008-2009.

Access to languagetraining self-paced products has been broadened.

Coordination and liaison

Coordination activities (research, studies, meetings, etc.) carried out by the federal institution itself along with other federal institutions or other orders of government; participation in activities organized by other federal institutions, other orders of government, etc.; participation of official languages champions, national and regional coordinators, and others in various government forums.

Expected Result

Co-operation with multiple partners to enhance OLMC development and vitality and to share best practices.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made
In the regions, the Canada School is represented on interdepartmental networks such as those of the official languages co-ordinators, official languages committees and the subcommittees of federal councils. These meetings enable departments to share best practices and discuss implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act. At these meetings, OLMC agencies were invited to present their projects or mandates in the hope of trying to find strategies for improved co-operation. Departments and agencies have gained a better knowledge of the issues and opportunities presented by the implementation of the Official Languages Act and were empowered to develop better practices and better meet their responsibilities in terms of services and staffing within the federal government.
The Canada School participated in a Departmental Advisory Committee meeting on Official Languages (DACOL). The Canada School provided presentations on online tools and products. The Canada School increased the visibility and awareness of its languagetraining products.
In Winnipeg, the Canada School organized a course entitled Comment apprivoiser le stress (mastering stress), in cooperation with the Interdepartmental Official Languages Network, a subcommittee of the Manitoba Federal Council. The course was attended by some 20 public servants whose first or second languagewas French. In addition, public servants received the opportunity to take a French course and to develop networks with other French-speaking individuals.

The public servants recognized the importance of maintaining their languageskills so that they can better serve the community, and they have requested additional training in this language.

This approach encouraged them to maintain and improve their languageskills in order to better serve the minority community.

The Canada School's Official Languages Champion continued to explore opportunities to develop a more structured network of official languages coordinators across the country, and to work actively both within and outside the organization to reinforce implementation of its action plan and promote the implementation of section 41 and Part VII of the Official Languages Act. The Canada School organized several internal events related to section 41 of the Official Languages Act and official languages:
  • The Official Languages Champion and Co-Champion for the Canada School were appointed in the Fall of 2007;
  • The Canada School established an Official Languages Champion Working Group (Summer 2008);
  • The Canada School Official Languages Champion Working Group held 5 meetings in 2008-2009.
  • The Canada School's Champion and Co-Champion regularly participated in the ADM Committee on Official Languages and Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions.
Timely appointment of a new Champion to exercise strong leadership in the promotion of linguistic duality.

Participation in committees, both within and outside the organization, to discuss official languages issues including the implementation of section 41 and Part VII of the Official Languages Act.

Funding and program delivery

Implementation of the federal institution's programs and delivery of its services; funding, alone or in cooperation with other federal institutions, of OLMC projects; inclusion of the needs of OLMCs in the delivery of the federal institution's programs and services.

Expected Result

OLMCs are part on the federal institution's regular clientele and have adequate access to its programs and services; OLMC needs (e.g. geographic dispersion and development opportunities) are taken into account.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made
In the regions, the Canada School maintained its collaborative agreements with the private sector (OLMCs) to ensure delivery of languagetraining to public servants. Through these agreements, hundreds of public servants have received classroom languagetraining given by OLMCs. The Canada School, with the assistance of OLMCs, has contributed to improving the languagecapacity of the public service in all regions of Canada.

Accountability

Activities through which the federal institution integrates its work on the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act into departmental planning and accountability mechanisms (e.g. report on plans and priorities, departmental performance report, departmental business plan and status report on implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act); internal audits and evaluations of programs and services; regular review of programs and services as well as policies by senior managers of the federal institution to ensure implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

Expected Result

Full integration of the OLMC perspective and section 41 of the Official Languages Act into the federal institution's policies, programs and services; the reporting structure, internal evaluations and policy reviews determine how to better integrate OLMCs' perspectives.
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made
The Canada School's program evaluation team conducted a formal evaluation of the online second languagetraining products on Campusdirect. Based on the results, the Canada School developed an action plan to respond to the recommendations. The Canada School's program evaluation team analysed the relevance, success and impact, design and delivery and profitability of the second languagecourses, products and tools on Campusdirect. Several action items have been addressed and continue to be addressed as identified in the action plan.
All mandatory public service management courses (offered by the Canada School), such as Authority Delegation Training, cover the objectives of the Official Languages Act and its implementation. The Canada School's Authority Delegation Training explains the responsibilities regarding the Official Languages Act to participating supervisors and managers at all levels.

A total of 8,133 participants nationally took Authority Delegation Training in 2008-2009.

The Canada School continued delivering Authority Delegation Training that increases the awareness of management responsibilities with regards to the Official Languages Act and its implementation.

Distribution List

Clerk of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages

See the Committee's Web site for the Clerk's contact information:
http://www2.parl.gc.ca/CommitteeBusiness/CommitteeContact.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=40&Ses=2

Clerk of the Senate Standing Committee on Official Languages

See the Committee's Web site for the Clerk's contact information:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/common/Committee_SenHome.asp?Language=E&Parl=40&Ses=3&comm_id=595

Commissioner of Official Languages

See the Web site of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for contact information:
http://www.ocol-clo.gc.ca/html/contact_e.php#ho

The Canada School's report on results can be found at:
http://www.csps-efpc. gc.ca/index-eng.aspx

See Treasury Board Secretariat guidelines on Internet posting – Communications Policy of the Government of Canada:
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pol/doc-eng.aspx?id=12316

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